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Antique George III Chest of Drawers Mahogany England XVIII Century

England, Late XVIII Century

Code: ANMOST0243489

1,066.00 £
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News
Antique George III Chest of Drawers Mahogany England XVIII Century

England, Late XVIII Century

Code: ANMOST0243489

1,066.00 £
WITH FREE SHIPPING
744.00 £ *
IF YOU PICK UP IN STORE
Discounted price if you collect the product in our shops in Milan and Cambiago:
* Optional choice in the cart
Add to cart
SAFE PAYMENTS
pagamenti sicuri
Request information
Book a date
Go to noleggio.dimanoinmano.it to rent the product
Rent

Antique George III Chest of Drawers Mahogany England XVIII Century - England, Late XVIII Century

Features

England, Late XVIII Century

Style:  George III (1750-1810)

Age:  18th Century / 1701 - 1800

Origin:  England

Main essence:  Silver Fir Mahogany Sessile Oak

Material:  Mahogany Slab

Description

George III mahogany veneered chest of drawers, England third quarter 18th century. Front with three drawers plus under-counter desk pull, wavy legs. Fir backrest. Lack of veneering.

Product Condition:
Product which, due to age and wear, may require restoration and re-polishing. We try to present the real state as fully as possible with photos. If some details are not clear from the photos, what is stated in the description applies.

Dimensions (cm):
Height: 101
Width: 105
Depth: 51,5

Additional Information

Style: George III (1750-1810)

It is part of the so-called "Georgian" period.
This term designates the stylistic activity that took place in England between 1714 and 1830 and included the reigns of George I, George II, George III and George IV.
It is characterized, at its beginnings, by an attitude of reaction to the Baroque.
Precise characteristics and distinctions of this style are not clearly identifiable in the furniture created in England in the eighteenth century.
In the first half of this century, cabinet-making and the products of the various categories of English applied art were affected by the continuous changes in taste and manifested, in the diversity of trends and influences, the uncertainty of a precise stylistic orientation.
In the second half of the eighteenth century, the sensitivity and exceptional ingenuity of four strong personalities, destined to guide the English taste and customs of the time, intervened in the second half of the eighteenth century: Th. Chippendale, R. Adam, G. Hepplewhite and Th. Sheraton.
Find out more with our insights:
FineArt: Tallboy George II, England c.1730
FineArt: Pair of Irish Mirrors, in George III Style, second half of the 19th century

Age: 18th Century / 1701 - 1800

18th Century / 1701 - 1800

Main essence:

Silver Fir

Soft coniferous wood, used for rustic furniture or to build the chest, that is the structure, of furniture then veneered in more precious woods. It has been used since ancient times, its most valuable use is, in the Spruce variant, in the inlays of French antique furniture of the '700 . The spruce, more typical of northern Europe, in Italy grows mainly in the Eastern Alps at altitudes above 1300 m. The noblest use of this essence was in the construction of violins, guitars and cellos: Stradivari himself produced his famous violins with this wood.

Mahogany

It is one of the most precious and sought-after woods in cabinet making. It was discovered in Central America around 1600 and began to be imported to England in the 1700s. Much appreciated for its hardness and indestructibility, it became widespread following the blocking of walnut exports from France in 1720 and the consequent elimination of English import duties on mahogany from the colonies in America and India. The most valuable version comes from Cuba, but it became very expensive. At the end of the 18th century it began to be used also in France in Louis XVI, Directory and Empire furniture, its diffusion declined starting from when Napoleon, in 1810, forbade its import. It was generally used in the manufacture of elegant furniture, due to its characteristics and beautiful grain.

Sessile Oak

Under the name of oak or oak various types of woods derived from plants of the genus quercus are grouped. They are always resistant, hard and compact woods. Oak is lighter than oak, both are used for more rustic furniture or for the interiors of French and English antique furniture. In other processes it was gradually replaced by the advent of exotic woods considered more valuable since the 18th century.

Material: Mahogany Slab

Product availability

The product can be seen at Milan

Immediate availability
Ready for delivery within 2 working days from ordering the product.

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